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Alan Johnston kidnapped

This topic contains 45 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Lone Lone 10 years, 9 months ago.

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  • Lone
    Lone
    Member

    I see this is up on the main page but not a topic posted here

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/6444473.stm

    I hope he get’s released unharmed, he’s one of the few western journalists in the occupied territories that I quite like.

    #33831 Reply
    Vicky23
    vicky23
    Member

    Is there any news on Alan Johnston?

    #33832 Reply
    Lone
    Lone
    Member

    vicky23 wrote:Is there any news on Alan Johnston?

    Sadly no

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/6454411.stm

    #33833 Reply

    I heard a few days ago, on BBC World about Alan.

    Has he been released?

    I hope you gets out a live!

    I really like his stories.

    #33834 Reply

    Any more news on Alan?

    #33835 Reply
    Lone
    Lone
    Member

    bbc World Fan wrote:Any more news on Alan?

    Sadly no

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/f … 459521.stm

    #33836 Reply
    Johnnie
    Johnnie
    Keymaster

    UPI wrote:A group of Palestinian journalists rallied Saturday outside Gaza’s parliament building to offer support for abducted BBC correspondent Alan Johnston.

    While the BBC said it has been unable to confirm that Johnston was indeed abducted last Monday, his fellow journalists gathered Saturday to offer a message of hope for the correspondent’s safe return.

    #33837 Reply
    Lone
    Lone
    Member

    Latest is that Alan is alive and well

    BBC correspondent Alan Johnston is ‘OK’
    Agencies

    Gaza City: The British Broadcasting Corporation said Monday it has received assurances that correspondent Alan Johnston, kidnapped in the Gaza Strip a week ago, was "OK," but didn’t know where he was being held.

    Middle East Bureaux Editor Simon Wilson, in the company’s first news conference since the abduction, said the BBC had
    no direct contact with the kidnappers, and didn’t know what the abductors’ motives were.

    "We are receiving assurances that people believe he is OK," Wilson said. "We are grateful for those assurances,
    but we are disappointed that we still don’t have any firm knowledge of his whereabouts seven days after he was
    kidnapped."

    Johnston was headed for his apartment in Gaza City when four masked gunmen snatched him from his car in Gaza City.
    Wilson said the BBC thought Johnston was being held in
    Gaza.

    Johnston, of Scotland, had been reporting from Gaza for the past three years.

    Earlier BBC had said it is increasingly concerned about correspondent Alan Johnston, one week after his disappearance in the Gaza Strip.

    Middle East bureau chief Simon Wilson said he was disappointed there was no firm news, adding it was time to redouble efforts to find him.

    It now seemed certain that the reporter had been abducted, he added.

    On Saturday Palestinian journalists demonstrated outside parliament in Gaza City in support of the correspondent.

    Palestinian Prime Minister Esmail Haniya of Hamas has condemned the abduction and said he has ordered security
    forces to search for the kidnappers.

    Johnston was the latest in a string of foreign journalists to be abducted in Gaza.

    #33838 Reply

    I saw on the news this morning that the BBC Staff had heald a vigil for Alan. I hope that he does get freed.

    #33839 Reply
    Lone
    Lone
    Member

    Events have taken place in London and Gaza to mark two weeks since BBC reporter Alan Johnston went missing.
    The BBC set up a satellite link between Gaza and Television Centre so staff and supporters could exchange messages of support on giant screens.

    Director General Mark Thompson praised Mr Johnston’s commitment for reporting from Gaza in very difficult conditions.

    "All of us in London and in Gaza want him home," Mr Thompson told about 100 journalists and members of staff.

    Mr Thompson described Alan Johnston as "one of those amazing BBC people who make extraordinary sacrifices and take considerable risks because they believe a story needs to be told".

    "He remained with his friends and colleagues in Gaza when others left, and as you have heard, Alan has many friends and colleagues in Gaza."

    "We continue to talk to people in the Middle East and in the UK to try to secure Alan’s release," he added.

    Speaking for the Palestinian journalists’ syndicate in Gaza, Shadi al-Kashif made a pledge directly to the missing journalist that their protests "will not stop until your release".

    Experienced reporter

    Palestinian officials have said all possible efforts are being made to secure Mr Johnston’s release.

    Gaza has already seen numerous demonstrations in support of the missing BBC correspondent.

    On Sunday more than 100 journalists, politicians, and others attended a rally in Gaza calling for his release and last Wednesday Palestinian journalists began a rolling strike.

    There have also been numerous international demands for his immediate release, including from the Arab League, the UK government and the EU.

    Mr Johnston has been the BBC’s correspondent in the Gaza Strip for the past three years – and the only foreign journalist from a major media organisation based in Gaza.

    The BBC describes him as a highly experienced and respected reporter.

    Aged 44, he was born in Tanzania and educated in Scotland.

    He joined the BBC World Service in 1991 and has spent eight of the last 16 years as a correspondent, including periods in Uzbekistan and Afghanistan.

    #33840 Reply
    Lone
    Lone
    Member

    Quite a large protest happening in support of Alan today, all Palestinian media journalists are on strike because of his kidnap and a lot of big media names coming out in support fo Alan, including David Frost, Jon Snow and the editor of Al-Jazeera.

    They showed the protests on Euronews, caught a glimpse of Katya Aldar amongst the protestors.

    Protests and vigils are continuing for BBC correspondent Alan Johnston, three weeks to the day after his suspected abduction in the Gaza Strip.
    Palestinian journalists began a boycott of their government and presidency to get them to do more for his release.

    Events are being held in the West Bank and London. In Gaza, 300 journalists stood with their mouths gagged.

    Dozens of media personalities signed an open letter in a UK newspaper urging him to be freed quickly and unharmed.

    David Dimbleby, Sir David Frost, Jon Snow and Christiane Amanpour of CNN are among hundreds of Mr Johnston’s friends and colleagues who backed a full-page advert in Monday’s Guardian newspaper.

    "It could have been any of us," Channel 4 News presenter Jon Snow told the BBC. "We have to stand together against this."

    Other signatories include:

    BBC Director-General, Mark Thompson
    Director of channels at Channel 4, Kevin Lygo
    Editors of several London newspapers
    Wadah Khanfar, editor-in-chief of Arabic TV network al-Jazeera
    The BBC has had no contact since 12 March with Mr Johnston, who has lived and worked in Gaza for the past three years.

    He is widely believed to have been kidnapped, but no demands have been made public.

    Boycott

    The head of the Palestinian Journalists’ Union, Naim Tubasi, told the BBC it was necessary to boycott Palestinian government proceedings because the authorities were doing little to help secure the journalist’s release.

    "This is unacceptable for us… We will boycott coverage of (President Mahmoud) Abbas if Johnston is not released," said Abu Dhabi TV correspondent Majed Said.

    During the boycott, Mr Tubasi said no Palestinian media outlet would cover stories on the activities of the presidency or the new unity government. He said the protests would continue until Mr Johnston was freed.

    Intensive international efforts have been going on to secure his safe return.

    These include appeals from the Arab League and the European Union and non-government groups such as Amnesty International and Reporters Without Frontiers.

    On Monday, the International Press Institute, a media watchdog, expressed "grave concern" about Alan Johnston’s fate.

    IPI director Johann Fritz called on anyone with influence in Gaza to intensify their efforts to ensure his freedom.

    "His work reporting fairly and accurately from Gaza has been widely praised. He has shed light on one of the world’s most demanding stories – in keeping with the highest standards of the BBC," Mr Fritz said in a statement.

    Senior BBC colleagues of Mr Johnston have appealed to Palestinian leaders including Mr Abbas and Palestinian Prime Minister Ismail Haniya.

    Both have said everything possible is being done to free Mr Johnston.

    The BBC describes him as a highly experienced and respected reporter.

    He joined the BBC World Service in 1991 and has spent eight of the last 16 years as a correspondent, including periods in Uzbekistan and Afghanistan.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle … 517911.stm

    #33841 Reply
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